What causes the colors in the aurora borealis?

What causes the colors in the aurora borealis?

These colors come from the atomic fluorescence of particles high above the earth’s surface. As charged particles from the sun’s “solar wind” spiral through the earth’s magnetic field toward its poles, they collide with one another and with atoms in the earth’s upper atmosphere. The energy of such collisions can excite the atoms involved and cause them to emit light.

How do oil spills/spots (i.e. in parking lots and streets) create rainbows?

How do oil spills/spots (i.e. in parking lots and streets) create rainbows?

A thin layer of oil on water creates interference effects, just like those seen in a thin soap film. Sunlight reflects from both the top and the bottom of the oil layer and these two reflections can interfere with one another. If the blue/green wavelengths of light interfere destructively on their way to your eye, you will see the oil layer as red. If the green/red wavelengths of light interfere destructively, you will see the oil layer as blue. How you see the oil layer depends on its thickness and the angles of the light.

Why do sunspots affect radio and TV reception?

Why do sunspots affect radio and TV reception?

Although I do not really know very much about the connection between sunspots and radio reception, I believe that the problem lies in with the solar wind. The solar wind is a steady stream of electrically charged particles that is responsible for the aurora, among other things. Since charged particles that interact with the earth’s magnetic field accelerate, they emit radio waves. These waves should cause reception problems on earth. If anyone reading this knows otherwise or has more information, please let me know.